KEG 2015 – Event Wrap-Up, Resources, and the Wally Awards

This year’s Kinetic Enthusiast Group (KEG) event was the largest to date. IT professionals from government agencies, business enterprises, school systems and service providers from across the U.S., Canada and Europe gathered for information-packed presentations, customer stories, networking and training.

Ben Christenson presents the 2015 Wally Awards at KEGKEG 2015 also featured the second annual Wally Awards—recognition given to customers who’ve done uniquely innovative things with Kinetic Data products and technologies. Among this year’s winners were:

Continue reading “KEG 2015 – Event Wrap-Up, Resources, and the Wally Awards”

Introducing Kinetic Core: The New Foundation for Kinetic Request

Kinetic Data’s director of products Kelly Heikkila is presenting “Kinetic Core — The New Platform for Kinetic Request″ today at the 4th annual KEG (Kinetic Enthusiasts Group) Conference. For those who couldn’t make it to the event in the Twin Cities, or just want to relive the session in blog format, here are highlights of the presentation.

by Kelly Heikkila

We’re excited to have the opportunity to introduce KEG attendees to the Kinetic Core platform and discuss what it means for the next generation of Kinetic Request.

Kinetic Core presentation at KEG 2015Our customers are doing great things with the current version of Kinetic Request—building out not only great service catalogs for IT, HR, Facilities and more—but also developing solutions that extend beyond the catalog. They’re creatively applying Kinetic Request technology in areas like:

  • Facility Check-Ins
  • Project Management
  • Light Inventory Management
  • Marketing Automation
  • Incident Management

Continue reading “Introducing Kinetic Core: The New Foundation for Kinetic Request”

Platform for the Future: Community-Based Tech Groups to Highlight KEG Event

As reported yesterday, the second day of the Kinetic Enthusiasts Group (KEG) event will kick off a bit differently than in years past.

Previous KEG conferences have featured keynote speeches from prominent industry analysts like Jeff Kaplan and Forrester’s Eveline Oehrlich. But the Tuesday morning session at KEG 2015 will focus more on giving back than on giving advice.Mike Bollinger

In place of a traditional keynote address, this year’s session titled Platform for the Future will feature a panel of ambassadors from several tech-focused community groups starting the day off with an inspirational discussion of how their organizations are building bridges to underserved communities.

The panel will be moderated by Mike Bollinger, co-founder of Minnesota technology news site TECHdotMN and founder of mobile design & development firm Livefront. Continue reading “Platform for the Future: Community-Based Tech Groups to Highlight KEG Event”

How to Accept Credit Card Payments in Kinetic Request

by Kelly Heikkila

Registration for Kinetic Data’s annual user conference, the Kinetic Enthusiasts Group (KEG), opened last week.  This year we wanted to make the registration process as seamless as possible.  Our outstanding hotel venue, The Depot Renaissance, offered a great landing page just for us booking the hotel for our event.  We also wanted to accept credit cards right within the form, versus emailing out an invoice as we had done in the past.  Enter Kinetic Request, Kinetic Task and Stripe credit card checkout service.

How to accept credit card payments with Kinetic Request - KEG 2015Adding Stripe checkout into a form is a fairly quick three-step process: Continue reading “How to Accept Credit Card Payments in Kinetic Request”

Hop on Board Now for the 2015 KEG Event at Early Bird Rates

The 2014 KEG event was a thrilling ride for attendees, with training, networking, and the first-ever Wally Awards, where companies were recognized for the innovative and creative use of Kinetic Data software.

KEG15 - Kinetic Enthusiasts GroupThis coming year’s journey to greater knowledge and success with Kinetic Data products, KEG15 – Platform for Success, will have a new destination: the historic Depot in downtown Minneapolis, a landmark hotel in a great location, with easy access to the Mississippi river, Target Field, microbreweries, restaurants and more. Continue reading “Hop on Board Now for the 2015 KEG Event at Early Bird Rates”

First-Ever Wally Awards Presented at KEG14 [Video]

Three Kinetic Data customers were honored with the inaugural Wally Awards, a.k.a. The Wallys, at this year’s Kinetic Enthusiast Group (KEG) Conference in Denver.

Our own Ben Christenson presided deftly and humorously over the awards ceremony at the closing session of KEG 2014.

Honored for their creative and effective use of Kinetic Data products were:

  • Favorite Poster Story (Advanced Technology Services);
  • Innovator of the Year (CareTech Solutions); and
  • Rookie of the Year (Nordstrom).

For complete awards coverage, check out the news release or the full-length video on our website. Oscar may be glitzy—but Wally is bendable.

Expanding Beyond IT: Strategies for Extending Request Management Across the Enterprise

Presented by Bill Harter and Matt Howe

Kinetic Data’s director of consulting Bill Harter and sales engineer Matt Howe are presenting “Expanding beyond IT — strategies for extending your Kinetic Request investment″ today at the 3rd annual KEG (Kinetic Enthusiasts Group) Conference. For those of you who couldn’t make it to the Denver event, or just want to review the session, here are some highlights of their presentation.

In many enterprises, each department or function (sales, accounting, HR, IT, facilities, etc.) has its own systems. This leads to very siloed thinking about business processes.

Enterprise Request Management (ERM) is like a company having its own internal version of Amazon.com, where employees can order any type of service or equipment, from any department (or group of functions), from a single web interface. Employees can also check the status of their requests at any time, similar to package tracking.

Though the scope of ERM is broad, implementation needn’t be excessively difficult, time-consuming or disruptive to operations.

ERM is not a product in itself, it is a framework with a new way to approach service request management.

A few specific comments on why we are doing this session:

  • You (or your IT groups) have tools, Kinetic Request perhaps being one of them. (If you’re not, and you’re curious, you can check out product details here.)
  • This isn’t a sales pitch. ERM is, as noted above, a concept–not a product. There are many approaches to implementing an ERM strategy.
  • What we want is your WHOLE organization (not just IT or one other business function) to take full advantage of the tools you have.

If I were to boil it down to a few simple goals for this session they would be as follows:

I hope that you each, in your own way, for your own situation, can increase your “focus on Expansion” (What might expansion look like for me and my organization?) of your current service request catalog approach.

As part of that we strive for you to walk away with some “new ideas” that you can action when you return to the workplace (What else can we do / try out to reach our vision?).

More specifically, this presentation will address:

  • ERM concepts: a few of the ERM concepts that will hopefully strike a nerve on your paradigms / perceptions of the deployment of request services — again with the goal to get you thinking about expansion.
  • Implementations: implementation strategies which certainly play a role in the set-up for expansion.
  • Expansion strategies: specific ideas on how to think about and position expansion.
  • Real-world examples of companies expanding their service request (ERM) approaches.

What is ERM?What I want to do here is highlight some of the ERM concepts that will hopefully resonate with the concept of expansion, starting with: What is ERM?

It’s a holistic approach, that centralizes service requesting, most likely involving some automation…. Self-Service 2.0.

As noted above, ERM is like a company having its own internal version of Amazon.com. It ensures first time fulfillment, lowers costs and makes for happier end users (internal or external customers).

Service Catalog Maturity LevelsThere are a few ERM concepts from that worth highlighting here. Forrester Research describes three levels of service catalog maturity:

(1) IT services (or subset of IT services)

(2) utilizing some automation of enterprise services

(3) acts as “services broker”

ERM thinking is of value regardless of an organization’ service catalog maturity.

In many enterprises, each department or function (sales, accounting, HR, IT, facilities, etc.) has its own systems. This leads to very siloed thinking about business processes.

The Six Sigma approach requires thinking across departmental or group barriers, to improve cross-functional business processes. It’s not always easy thing cross-functionally; but if processes are already optimized within functions, it makes sense that the largest remaining opportunities for improvement exist in the “white spaces” between different business functions.

The ultimate target is for Service Catalogs to mature from IT service catalogs to business (enterprise-wide) service catalogs.

Focusing on customer-centric fulfillment eliminates need for employees to manually manage their requests, deal with multiple departments, systems and processes, obtain approvals and schedule deliverables. With ERM, most processes are automated by software, and employees are shielded from the complexities of the underlying processes. Fulfillment is faster, more accurate, and requires much less employee effort.

ERM: Start by Thinking SmallThough the scope of ERM is broad, implementation needn’t be excessively difficult, time-consuming or disruptive to operations.

ERM is not a product in itself, it is a framework with a new way to approach service request management.

ERM projects should never end. The goal of employing an ERM strategy is not about ‘turning it on and being done’. It’s a framework for supporting improvable service strategies that can evolve with the ever changing need.

A key concept of ERM is using process automation tools to orchestrate back-end systems of records in many different departments or functions. That allows an easy move from narrow and shallow to wide and deep, automating complex requests that may span multiple parts of the enterprise using lessons learned from earlier and simpler types of request management.

You want to improve your on-boarding process?… Start by tackling the process at a macro level. You can always version it forward and improve things at a micro-level later. Automate and improve the things you can do immediately. If you have a part of the process that requires inputting data to five different systems, use the ERM system to collect the data once and input it where it can go. Even if you don’t have access to automate all of the inputs and fulfillments in the first phase, solve what you can. It will improve the process from where it is today setting up future versions of a process that continue to improve granularity.

During our scoping with new clients and as part of our delivery during implementations, we often find ourselves trying to convince organizations to take things on in bite size chunks.

It’s great to think “Big Picture”—but do it in small pieces. Rome wasn’t built in a day (or even a decade).

What is the long-term impact and how can we get there with short term wins? Start by adding services in the portal, even if they are not perfectly defined; they can be improved over time. No service is 100% perfect from inception. Get people using it, gather feedback, evaluate results, and continually improve things over time!

A good analogy is Facebook. Ten years ago, Facebook had a few features. You could “like” and “poke” people and send messages. Today it has thousands of features. They got people using the platform and had a vision to continue to roll out new content/features and integrations. Once people were using it—they were hooked.

Lots of little improvements make for big improvements across the entire organization. As you have success, you can take a foot out of the apple tree (we often talk about low hanging fruit, well let’s make more low hanging fruit).

The ERM Implementation ProcessAs a reference, here is a proposed guide for how to implement ERM process. As an organization identifies new services to expand into their catalog, this is a way to do it and evolve. This also shows the core technology components required for an ERM implementation.

LEGO Model 1

 

 

 

 

Thinking about it another way—because Matt Howe likes to build LEGO models—here’s an assemblage that’s impressive on its own, recreating an actual scene. But it is part of a larger picture…a larger “vision” if you will.

LEGO Model 2

 

 

 

 

Now we’re exposed to “more people”, more things are happening here.

LEGO Model 3

 

 

 

 

The whole picture…or is it?

LEGO Model - Full View

 

 

 

 

 

An entire section of Washington DC. (at LEGOLAND, not in Matt’s front yard room).

This wasn’t built in a day either—it started from a single brick. What’s the point?

Think of technology like request portal software (such as Kinetic Request) and workflow automation software (such as Kinetic Task) as key components—like LEGO building blocks—for creating an enterprise-wide process automation strategy which accelerates your business and drives innovation. Automation frees people from manual actions to focus on other—higher-value—activities. Activities that are core to your business, that enhance the “secret sauce” that makes your company different and special.

Why expand the use of service catalog tools beyond IT?

  • To leverage existing investments. Continue telling your company how smart it was that you bought them, and how they can be used in a myriad of ways.
  • Migration to the cloud. These tools provide integration with legacy/internal systems and processes (such as the new hire process)
  • To make other functional groups aware of what’s possible.
    • facilities (an underserved area of the corporate life that really matters to employees!); other IT areas [operations, NOC, service desk] lots of options for streamline and automate;
    • business groups [business-to-IT interactions, paper forms]; and
    • complaints – where there’s a complaint, there’s an opportunity!
  • To improve the business. Success leveraging your tools means success for the business. Realize their potential and change your business with them.

Start by taking stock of current situation.

Don’t limit your thinking to how your tools are used today; try to thing about using them for more generic business purposes.

When new product features are released, try to apply the concept to something in your business/organization/environment.

  • Review your current system and resources/staff.
  • What is the “vision” of your current portal/implementation? Are you meeting it?
  • Will new “stuff” be part of the current design, or separate? (Remember that what you have today is just one chapter, not necessarily the whole book!)
  • Do your staff have the necessary skills to help you “sell”? To back up “the talk” with technical know how?
  • Are new team members getting necessary training? Do they bring “extra” skills with them you can leverage (e.g., CSS, HTML, JavaScript, etc.)?

Share with the business where you are currently, and continue to do so. Put yourself in a position to offer a solution.

Set goals for expanded/enhanced use of your tools, such as:

  • Speeding up support ticket entry
  • Call scripting
  • Creating and analyzing surveys
  • Reducing costs (or avoiding costs) in other ways

Here are half a dozen strategies for expanding service request management across your organization.

Service Catalog Expansion StrategiesStrategy #1 – Expand in your current framework

For a majority of Kinetic Data customers, a “Service Catalog” project is what started our relationship. A lot of initial interest from a few years ago centered around ITIL’s service catalog concepts. There has been less discussion of ITIL lately, but the “service catalog” concept can be applied to many areas of the business: Marketing, Operations, Customer Service, Finance, Research & Development, Accounting, Legal, Facilities, HR.

So while there is less buzz about ITIL, there is much more about consumers, consumerization, customers (the “age of the customer” as Forrester Research phrases it).

Strategy #2: Create a portal—or expand your ownto include services for these other groups.

People are creatures of habit. Cultural changes take time and diligence. As explained in The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell, people adopt ideas and practices that are “sticky” and accessible. Don’t be afraid to help “tip” the culture from one of “I need help!” to a culture of “I’m going to help myself!” Ecommerce has already conditioned people to use the web for ordering products/services in their daily life. Why should work-life be any different?

If you want people to use a portal of services—make it EASY, available and seamless. Remove the barriers for self-service and make the user experience ‘sticky.” If it’s a great experience and it “sticks” in someone’s mind that it is easier to request something from a portal than from calling for help—they will use it.

Once you get people using the portal, you can continue to expand service offerings and improve things over time. Design it in a way that will support a long-term vision and is iterative. Don’t worry about being perfect out of the gate!

Business groups will be reluctant to adopt the system unless they can improve their productivity by receiving better business services.

Service Request Expansion Strategies - Beyond the OrdinaryStrategy #3: Think beyond the ordinary; use the capabilities of the tools.

Think beyond traditional service requests, to any business process/system with the need to request something (a triggering request submission) that will require others to take actions (fulfillment and in some cases pre-approval, etc.) . The workflow may be paper today, may be part automated, may be email only, etc.

Paper doesn’t support a mobile workforce; you have to store it; it’s bad for the environment. If you are still using paper, or if the term fax still exists within your organization…offer an automation engine tool for systems that don’t have one.

Automate. Don’t just enable self-help for creating help desk tickets. Can you solve the problem? Are you trying to solve the problem? Make self-help actually help.

Extend Service Request Ownership Beyond ITStrategy #4 – Partner with others and “the business.”

As a team you can achieve MORE…..FASTER! Distribute the management of the system. Don’t be afraid to empower groups within the organization to take ownership of their parts. It’s the concept of “self-help” again.. If HR wants to have a portal, encourage them to use the system and build it out.

By including others in the vision, new ideas will be introduced. Service catalog software like Kinetic Request is designed to allow for distributed management. If you want thousands of services built in the system, you will get there faster by having more people participate in building the service items they require.

It doesn’t have to be an “IT solution” that HR uses. Make it an HR solution that IT supports.

Strategy #5 – Show value.

Explaining value is easier with facts! Track, Measure, Improve. An ERM strategy allows you to empower users to help themselves with self-service. It also provides a scalable, repeatable and auditable framework for continuous improvement. To define key areas for improvement, it helps to break down processes to understand where automation can improve service and reduce cost.

ERM provides measurable cost savings through self-service.

Evangelize Request Management SuccessStrategy #6 – Socialize and celebrate

Success is many things—not just a completed catalog. Celebrate that you are changing your business, cost effectively. You are directly correlating to the bottom line

Don’t be afraid to sell or socialize your success! Ongoing evangelism is critical to making people aware of the power of the system. What people don’t know they don’t know. If you want people to take an idea and run with it, they need to know about it.

Thank you!

Next steps?

Kinetic Process Options: Creating Work Orders with Kinetic Fulfillment

Kinetic Data developer/analyst Brian Peterson is  presenting “Kinetic Process Options (Work Orders / Fulfillment)” today at the 3rd annual KEG (Kinetic Enthusiasts Group) Conference.  For those of you who couldn’t make it to the Denver event, or just want to review the session, here are some highlights of his presentation.

Brian is also the coordinator of Kinetic Community and would love to hear your feedback about the site.

Until now, many organizations have had to rely on complex forms with generic fields to assign actionable tasks to their Support Groups.

Just say no to complex, rigid applicationsActionable tasks are actions that need to be assigned to and completed by a person.  These can be actions such as create a user ID, modify access or purchase a tablet. Clients have had to assign actionable tasks using forms and applications that do not effectively capture the important information upon completion. They contain a large quantity of fields which become noise to the users. Generic text fields such as “Notes” or “Resolution” rely on the person completing the task to know what information to put in the task.

There is no simple or effective way to validate the information in a free text field. If information needs to be extracted from this “Notes” field by a workflow process or reporting, the field needs to be parsed.  Parsing a text field for specific information is always complex and problematic.

The workflow process behind these forms are complex and attempt to be “one size fits all.” Modifying the workflow process behind these applications is discouraged by the vendor, and if you do make modification it is very difficult and at times similar to playing Jenga—take out the wrong piece and comes crashing down.  They do not enable  “Your process your way.”

Our clients need more. They have encouraged and challenged Kinetic Data to provide them a solution to these issues within the Kinetic Request product.

Introducing Kinetic FulfillmentOur response to their needs and requirements is Kinetic Fulfillment.

It’s flexible, lightweight and clean with minimal fields.  It is simple and similar to other web forms which users are familiar with and comfortable using.  It can be easily branded and styled to match your company’s standard colors logo.

When automation isn’t possible, our clients need an application to manage and assign actionable tasks to groups or to individuals within groups.

They want it built on Kinetic Request so that it uses a common and consistent application throughout the lifecycle of the request.

It needs to have a workflow engine behind it to  meet their workflow process requirements.

They need a lightweight, clean and flexible solution that is easy to use.  It needs to contain targeted, specific, and relevant completion questions to get the important information upon completion of the task.

Kinetic Fulfillment meets these requirements.

Structure of Kinetic Bundles and Bundle PackagesKinetic Fulfillment is an application built on Kinetic Request.  This type of application is what we call a Bundle Package. Bundles install into Kinetic Request and Bundle Packages install into Bundles.

As defined on Kinetic Community “Bundles are web-based add-ons to Kinetic Request which allow you to quickly create a web interface to your request catalog.”

A Bundle is a deployment or installation which includes shared functionality and branding for a Kinetic Request catalog.

Bundle Packages are similar to a Bundles, but they are narrower in scope and more focused on adding specific functionality. They also includes the elements and processes necessary to support their own features

A Bundle Package may still leverage features and styling of its parent Bundle.  It can dropped into a Bundle and retain the branding and styling as the rest of the catalog with minimal or no effort.

Kinetic Fulfillment is comprised of two major components: Work Orders and the Fulfillment Console.

Creating Work Orders in Kinetic FulfillmentWork Orders are the actionable task records which are assigned to groups or users.  Work Orders contain all of the information necessary for the fulfiller to complete the required task.  The Kinetic Fulfillment application contains all of the logic and events necessary to manage its lifecycle and state.

A Work Order is a Service Item in Kinetic Request. Service Items are the front-end request forms which are built by Kinetic Request.  Service Items are where the questions are presented to the User.

Because Kinetic Fulfillment is built on Kinetic Request, Service Items are used as the framework and delivery for Work Orders.  Specialized features and functionality have been added to a Work Order Service Item.

Developing and maintaining a Work Order involves the same skills, tools and applications as working with requests.  Request developers no longer need another application or additional skill set to create and assign tasks.

This also helps provide a consistent UI and branding with the rest of the service catalog.

Work Order Fields DetailAll Work Orders contain several unique fields which help define it and identify its state.  These fields are located at the top of the Work Order. Your workflow process will give these fields their initial values and assign the Work Order to the correct group or user.

Status is used to communicate the state of the work order.  It tells others and the workflow process what stage of the lifecycle the Work Order is in. Many organizations have their own requirements and ideas of what values should be in a status menu.  We’ve made this list of values configurable so that clients can create status list that meets their needs.

A Work Order has a Company, Organization, Group and User Hierarchy. It can be assigned to an entire group or to a single user in a group. Out of the box, Works Orders can use groups from ITSM or from Fulfillment’s own data source.  However, it is flexible enough to use groups from an alternate data source.

Work Order AcknowledgementsDue Date indicates the date on which the Work Order is due to be completed. The date picker is displayed when clicking on the calendar icon

Priority indicates the Priority of the Work Order: Low, Normal or Urgent. Acknowledged allows the Work Order to be acknowledged without modifying the status.

Entering Work Information on a Work OrderThose of you who use BMC ITSM are familiar with Work Information. In Kinetic Fulfillment, Work Information is used to share information and attachments with the Requester and other Work Order Fulfillers. Work Information may be flagged as public (intended to be shared with the Requester ) or private (intended to only be shared with the Fulfiller). Multiple Work Information records can be added to a Work Order

Example - Tablet Request Workflow ProcessHere is an example process for Requesting a tablet.

  • The tablet is requested.

  • The manager approves the request.

  • The tablet is procured and delivered.

Each Request, such as a request for a tablet or a request for a user ID, can utilize a different Work Order  or multiple Work Orders in their workflow processes.

In other instances, the Work Orders may need to be the same.  The Network ID Request and the Database ID Request may have the same Work Order requirements.  If so they can both use the Work Order.

When multiple Work Orders are created, each can be designed to target specific completion information by including questions unique to their process and requirements.

A Request for a Tablet may need a Work Order to capture the tablet make, model, and serial number upon completion.  A Work Order for a new User ID may only require the ID of the new user to be provided.

Creating a request-specific Work Order can ensure quality data is captured by including specific, targeted questions.  Targeted questions tell the user precisely what information to provide; a field labeled “Resolution” or  “Notes” doesn’t.

For example, a question labeled “Tablet Make”, “Tablet Model” or “Serial Number” tells the user exactly what information is needed.  The workflow process also now “knows” where the Model and Serial number are stored. The information can easily be accessed by the workflow process without needing to parse a generic text field.  This enables workflow automation.  The workflow process can easily update a CMDB or other asset repository with information provided in the Work Order.

Work Orders are built on Kinetic Request so they can leverage other features of the product. As an example, events and dynamic menus can be used to further refine the completion information that is provided to the Work Order, such as: the Nexus 7 is specific to the Google Tablet.  If a different Make is selected, the menu changes to list only the models which relate to the selected make of tablet.

We can also apply data validation to the questions.  Data validation can be used to ensure a valid phone number, username, email address, or IP address are provided.  It could also be as simple as making the answer to a question required.

Work Orders can also be shared by workflow processes. Sharing Work Orders reduces the need for maintenance.  If a change is needed or a bug is discovered, the changes or corrections only need to be made to a single Work Order.

Reusing a Work Order also decreases development time.  When Work Orders are reused, users are already familiar with them.  This provides a consistency to the to workflow processes.

Fulfillment includes the flexibility to use either Shared or Targeted Work Orders.

Work Orders can also be cloned, which makes creating a new Work Order quick and easy.

A Work Order is just a type of Service Item in Kinetic Request.  The same tools and methods are used within Kinetic Request to quickly and easily create a new Work Order to target specific completion information.  A Work Order Service Item Template can be quickly cloned, then have targeted questions added  The use of the Work Order is then defined in the appropriate workflow processes.  The built-in functionality of the Work Order hides these questions until the fulfiller is ready to answer them.

The Tablet Request example shown earlier was simplified; there is more to the processes than this.

In real business scenarios, much more happens than just creating a Work Order. Multiple processes can happen during the lifecycle of the Work Order.  There are email notifications to be sent, SLA Flags to be set, a CMDB to be updated, and perhaps updates made to a customer’s ticketing system which is monitoring progress.

Tablet Request Workflow DetailIn our Tablet Request example, its workflow process creates the Work Orders.  When a Work Order node executes, it creates the Work Order and pauses; the Work Order has its own workflow processes to execute, in this case Assignment and Complete.

Work Order Workflow ProcessA Work Order can have several workflow processes to execute. In a Work Order, there are several triggers which can execute a one of many workflow processes.

Now we have introduced new hooks to executing workflow processes in between the time of creation and completion. Workflow processes can be grouped by event or action, which makes them reusable.

Re-using and sharing Work OrdersNot only can Work Orders be either Shared or Unique, but so also the Workflow Processes can be.

The Purchase Tablet Work Order may have a unique workflow process for Completion.  However, it may share a Workflow Process with Create ID.  Either scenario can be accomplished.

We have created these reusable pieces that can be used to create workflow processes and meet a variety of requirements.  Pick an existing Work Order and Workflow Process  or create new ones and the process for your request.

A Workflow can be executed before Submission. Example uses of this include:

  • Send emails – On Reassignment
  • Set SLA Flag – Modify Values to indicate In Progress
  • Request information from the requestor or another individual – Common requirement to have a request for more information
  • Update an external system – Update with status change

If you can put it in a workflow process, it can be run.

Worflow Automation with Kinetic TaskAll of these Workflow processes are made possible by the Kinetic Task Product.  Kinetic Task is Kinetic Data’s Graphical Workflow Process Builder. The Developer builds a Task Tree to define the workflow process.

Nodes in the tree represent Task Handlers.  Task Handlers are the building blocks of a Task Tree.  Handlers execute the actions and make the decisions in the Task Trees.

Many core handlers are included with Kinetic Task, but we also have a library of useful handlers available on Kinetic Community to perform tasks such as sending approvals and emails; retrieving personnel information; and reading data from / writing data to external applications like Remedy, Salesforce and ServiceNow.  And of course we have a handler to create Work Orders.

The Handlers are dragged into the Task Tree from a list of available handlers, configured and then connected to other nodes.

Process Fulfillment ConsoleThe second main component of Kinetic Fulfillment is the Fulfillment Console.

The Fulfillment Console is the Work Queue for Work Orders.  It allows fulfillers to see what tasks are assigned to them and to manage and view the Work Orders which need their attention.  It is an important tools for managing and prioritizing Work Orders assigned to fulfillers.

Fulfiller can prioritize work queues by:

  • Assignment;
  • Priority;
  • Due Date; or
  • Status.

Additionally, Work Orders are categorized into different tabs such as:

  • “My Work Orders”
  • “Open Work Orders”
  • “Unassigned Work Orders”

The Fulfillment Console includes an additional tab for Searching Work Orders. Work Orders can be opened and assigned from the Fulfillment Console.

Work Orders in Kinetic Fulfillment are lightweight, clean and flexible, with no extraneous fields.

A Work Order can display only Targeted Questions that are required to complete the specific assigned task.  These dedicated fields can also be used to better direct the user to provide specific information needed.  This also gives provides better event management and data validation.

With Kinetic Fulfillment, you’re no longer slave to large applications which attempt to conform their workflow process to fit everything.  You have the flexibility to create workflow processes to meet your unique requirements.   If you want an email notification to be sent, add that to the workflow process. It’s your process.

Each of these processes is reusable.  Build it once and include it in other Work Orders.

Reuse these workflow processes when you can or create new unique workflow process where the requirements are different.  The workflow process executed upon a status change for the Tablet Work Order doesn’t need to be the same as on the Create User ID Work Order.

Execute the workflow process at any point in the lifecycle of a work order.  If you can do the workflow in a workflow process, you can run it at any time in a Work Order.

Thank you!

What’s next?