Better Service Visibility = Better Delivery!

Service disruption occurs when change and release management collisions occur.

How do we prevent these collisions from occurring in the first place?

Even the most sophisticated teams are subjected to these problems; why?

No matter how much planning and automation you have, there are still outages!

Now the service desk is getting hammered with calls and a VP is irate over not being able to reach his “key” system. No one is happy. The world is on fire!

We planned. We strategized… We have GREAT tools! We have GREAT PEOPLE! We AUTOMATE!!!

Why? Why me? Why us?

While you may have planned accordingly, followed the good practice handbook to the letter and thought you understood the decisions in the CAB, you still had collisions. Why?

Because you made decisions based on incomplete information.

There are MANY systems of record that hold critical information related to service delivery. That information is often not all in a single database — such as your ITSM system.

Vacation and business event information? It’s in your messaging system (Exchange).

Customer specific case information? It’s in your CRM (Salesforce.com).

Release information? It’s in your ITSM system (ServiceNow).

If key data related to change/release decisions is not all in the same system, the effort to correlate it may be painful and time-consuming, but; ultimately it is worth it if service is improved. Figure out how to get it correlated — even if it is a spreadsheet. Reduce the risk by knowing what is what.

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1:56 — A demonstration of a unified calendar view.

We built Kinetic Calendar to enable real-time visibility into key data from multiple applications. it’s more important than ever to be able to cross reference data from those systems. Request a free demo here.

Pioneering Change with Learning and Courage

“Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn”

-John Maxwell

Thirty years ago the Challenger Space shuttle exploded as America watched in shock and horror. This tragedy was perhaps one of the biggest speed bumps in our humanity’s progress toward furthering space exploration.

The men and women who gave their lives that day were the brave pioneers that took the biggest risk for their team.  And how did we respond? By mourning, remembering and honoring them by continuing to fail well on our path toward space exploration.

The amount of planning, work, engineering and money that led up to the mission was massive. The amount of review work, post failure; also massive. These are all the costs of innovative change. The political leadership, development of NASA and funding of the space program; all of these things might seem impossible if they hadn’t been done yet. And they hadn’t. So how did we get here?

Human beings traveling to space was unthinkable.

Without starting there is no failure. Without failure we will never succeed in something that was once unthinkable.  Why?  Because failure offers us the best opportunity to learn and evolve.

So how did we get to that point? How does a group of people start exploring the unknown? How do we start taking the right path toward failure? And once we fail, how do we learn and adjust?

No matter what your goal is, having the right team is where you start. Once you’ve got the necessary people, just start. Talk about what you are going to try, and don’t forget to discuss the elephant in the room: how will you respond to failure?

Do everything you can to plan and account for failure in all you try. Because failure is eminent, including it in your planning means you get to decide how you react. Planning on putting in a business critical system? How flexible does it need to be to account for new situations? What happens when your system goes down? Does it completely destroy your ability to be productive?

Is there a better way? If so, you’ll probably learn it during your journey.