Portals: In your pocket

This post is the seventh in a series about building portals for teams and groups to interact with customers. If you’re interested in reading more please follow us on twitter or subscribe in the right-hand margin of this blog —>

Team Leader: What do we want?

Team: Supercomputers in our pockets!

Team Leader: What do we got?

Team: Supercomputers in our pockets.

If you’ve made it this far in your journey toward a comprehensive customer portal: CONGRATULATIONS! You now have a system of customer engagement. This is a goal many brands fail at many many times before seeing success.

So – you know where I’m going next right? The customer. What do they want now? You’ve given them a voice, and enabled powerful access to your data and services.

What could customers possibly want besides everything?

Easy; they also want it all times and places.

They want this new system of engagement to be with them at all times. I’m working at 2am on my 23rd cup of coffee. I’m excited and inspired to make our company’s next new product.

Take the opportunity to delight your customers by fulfilling their needs at the time they need.

“Oh hey, I should tell finance about this material shortage that is predicted by our research partners” – goes to finance portal on iPhone.

“I need to order 300 pounds of rubber.” – goes to procurement portal on Android.

“I like Peter. What’s his email address?” – looks up employee info on a web browser on his child’s internet connected pillow.

These are the realities of today. These are not predictions. Your colleagues and co-workers deserve the right to work freely and to do so when it’s convenient to them and on their terms.

Does your portal require Internet Explorer 11 so that business rules can be enforced? Terrible.

Does your portal require a mobile version and a desktop version? Stupid.

Gone are these old perceptions of web development. Now there is only disruption, connection and communication. The rest is just a check-box on a management system.

Get every customer engagement on mobile to keep them as a customer.

Else; you may as well close the door on over half of your users, half of the time.

2017 is the year

We believe that 2017 is going to be a big year for knowledge workers.

We have seen many teams become more flexible and innovative. Many of our larger clients are forming small yet highly effective teams.

Teams that are flexible and innovative require tools that support their unique needs. Get started now, iterate, improve and review later.

This is easier said than done. Teams are holding discussions about work in many different channels. And so often these ideas, work and initiatives don’t get off the ground because they are gone, lost or never got started.

If these teams have cross-team dependencies, they are inhibited quickly. Do we take on this new teams tasks without current tools? Limit the team to the same tools as others? What’s most important?

We believe that 2017 is the year this paralyzing cycle simply stops.

We believe that 2017 is the year we get to work without over-planning, over-thinking and the paralysis that inevitably ensues. Do employees dream of doing better? Often.

How often are your best teams highly productive?

We believe that 2017 is the year your team can plan, do, check and act without the confusion, fear and uncertainty they experience today.

We believe that 2017 is the last year you manage projects and tasks in your email.

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Better Service Visibility = Better Delivery!

Service disruption occurs when change and release management collisions occur.

How do we prevent these collisions from occurring in the first place?

Even the most sophisticated teams are subjected to these problems; why?

No matter how much planning and automation you have, there are still outages!

Now the service desk is getting hammered with calls and a VP is irate over not being able to reach his “key” system. No one is happy. The world is on fire!

We planned. We strategized… We have GREAT tools! We have GREAT PEOPLE! We AUTOMATE!!!

Why? Why me? Why us?

While you may have planned accordingly, followed the good practice handbook to the letter and thought you understood the decisions in the CAB, you still had collisions. Why?

Because you made decisions based on incomplete information.

There are MANY systems of record that hold critical information related to service delivery. That information is often not all in a single database — such as your ITSM system.

Vacation and business event information? It’s in your messaging system (Exchange).

Customer specific case information? It’s in your CRM (Salesforce.com).

Release information? It’s in your ITSM system (ServiceNow).

If key data related to change/release decisions is not all in the same system, the effort to correlate it may be painful and time-consuming, but; ultimately it is worth it if service is improved. Figure out how to get it correlated — even if it is a spreadsheet. Reduce the risk by knowing what is what.

calendar-video-preview-1
1:56 — A demonstration of a unified calendar view.

We built Kinetic Calendar to enable real-time visibility into key data from multiple applications. it’s more important than ever to be able to cross reference data from those systems. Request a free demo here.

Are We There Yet?

magic-cube-cube-puzzle-play-54101tl,dr; flexibility. From buying a new app to acquiring a company, your ability to integrate can make or break returns.

When your doctor prescribes medicine there are many questions. A patient might ask “How long until it kicks in?”

This applies to business decisions as well. Adopt a new system and executives begin to ask “When will realize value?” Start shipping a new product line and investors wonder “When will profits emerge?”

How do we answer these questions with accuracy and speed? One thing acquisitive companies do is compare books. Take a look at the finances. Look at the details of operation expenses, profits and capital expenditures. This gives you a great deal of insight about the hard facts of a business.

There are many other aspects aside from finance though. How do new products get more clarity on when profits will emerge? Unique funding tools like kickstarter have shed light on this. Why not get people signed up to buy before or during design? Have you asked people if they would buy your product? Will they? How will you tell them when it’s ready?

What if you took the kickstarter model to heart?

How will employees know when a new system will be available? When will their jobs get easier or more streamlined? Have you asked for their input?

Kickstarter has a ton of value beyond just crowdfunding. It’s a way to communicate, survey and set expectations. These functions are critical during times of flux and change.

Knowing where our teams, systems and colleagues are within a transition empowers speed.

We’re building your next kickstarter and can’t wait to share it with you. You can also try it out for yourself here.

To learn how our software empowers organizations to architect for fast integration, read our stuff on preparing to realize the value of BIG change.

 

Your Next ITSM Tool Should be Neither

TL,DR; decouple IT operations from customer service and development. Then realize the incredible savings and benefits thereof.

The term “ITSM” has always bugged me, and I think I know why.

The primary customer of ITSM is IT; everything else is lumped into “customer service” and “customer experience”.

ITSM_WikiEven Wikipedia says there are too many “fluff words” and that ITSM has an unclear definition.

But in IT, we know better. We understand what we’re talking about when we say Service Management. It’s a standard way of operating so we don’t fail.

So why would any business person buy Service Management?

To keep the lights on.

“But that’s what we hired you for! We don’t care what you call it. We don’t want to buy it, we want you to DO IT!”

Then I’ll need $1.5m every three years to replace my tools, redesign processes and…

Wait, $1.5m? Don’t you remember when last year we were managing changes via email? Don’t you remember the spreadsheets of Assets? Why $1.5m?

Technology has become complex and our colleagues want to reduce risk. Some also want to understand the value and depreciation of assets. ITSM is just IT Operations Management + Customer Service.

DING DING DING DING DING DING – we have a winner! Here’s your $1.5 million. But why every three years?

Think of ITSM tools like a car lease. Three years comes along, and it’s time for a fresh smelling one, the latest one with all the bells and whistles.

Do the bells and whistles keep the lights on?

No.

Then why keep upgrading and rebuilding your operations empire?

The tools and practices that surround Service Management change, and they change often.  Have you considered who benefits from that change?

Consider separating your systems of operation from your systems of service. It gives you the freedom to change platforms without impacting your customers.

The impact of this is far greater than you realize. We believe in building systems of engagement separate from systems of record. To understand the nature of this problem:

 

systems-of-recordDoes this image describe your problem? If so, you’ll be interested in understanding our approach to enterprise software. Read more here, or just call us directly: 1-651-556-1030

Lessons from a Scrum Master

I’ve been a ScrumMaster for 6 years and previously at a hospital and not Matterin product development. So I did a “scrum training” session a few months ago and that went really well. Next I worked to condense that session from 2.5 hour scrum training into 30 minutes, and again into 15 minutes.

So read it, and burn some time reading!

I’m Matt “Matter” Raykowski and I’m a Product Developer and “Level 37 JavaScript Sorcerer”. They call me “Matter” because we have a habit of collecting Matts (4) and Brians (4) in the office.

HockeyRinkI built a “hockey rink” in my back yard for my kids.

Okay – so what is agility?

Contrary to some people’s beliefs ‘agility’ is not a process. It is not something that can be condensed into a document, passed out to employees, and then expected to be followed to guaranteed success. It is a way of thinking. It is, and this is important, a culture.

So you might have thought oh no, he’s going to babble on about scrum.

Or ˈkänbän/.

Or some other post-it™ driven process or technique.

Okay, yes, we do use scrum at Kinetic. It’s wonderful. You should try it. You can use it for anything, not just software. Who knows what scrum is? Just in case you don’t it’s one of many agile methodologies, which includes XP (Extreme Programming), Kanban, and Lean Software Development.

But if agile isn’t a process, a framework, or some other finite set of rules I can impose upon my employees to ensure instant success… what is it? What good is it?

We value…

Value in statements on the right, value left more

  • Individuals and Interactions over Process and Tools
  • Working Software over Comprehensive Documentation
  • Customer Collaboration over Contract Negotiation
  • Responding to Change over Following a Plan

Who recognizes this? Agile Manifesto.

Well, that was boring. Right? If you want more, check out the agile manifesto. What is important is what motivates people. It is this: autonomy, mastery, and purpose. How on earth do the Four Core help with this? Well, let’s look at the culture here at Kinetic.

There’s a process in everything. This is how we plan, this is how we do deployments, this is how we do releases. But they’re not sticks used to keep us in line. Our Sonar and coverage reports are important tools but do not dictate how we develop the product. There’s a trust that we’re competent individuals, that we know how best to solve complicated problems. As a matter of fact that’s probably why we were hired in the first place. At Kinetic Data ceremonies are informal and used to collaborate and communicate.

We keep our process light so people solve problems right.

First the manifesto says “software” everywhere. It’s not just software. It’s “stuff” and “things”.

We care less and less about the spec we created over a year and a half ago on how our latest version was to be designed.

Our goal isn’t to deliver a software package designed to spec. Our goal is to provide working, quality software.

It won’t take long for you to develop against a spec before you realize that you totally forgot about something or that the concept is fundamentally flawed in some way. Being forced to make some horrible piece of software people are going to hate just because of ‘what the spec says’ makes me a sad person.

Plus, who wants to write all of that documentation knowing it’ll be totally irrelevant before the  project even ends?

Dogs, working together, cats… being cats.

So I’d rather look at this horrible feature and say, “hey, this is horrible, let’s do this differently.” Okay sure, there’s a legal contract regarding the Statement of Work and yadda yadda. But that doesn’t mean you hand us a piece of paper and we blindly implement it, even if we discover some new information that makes it clear it needs to be redesigned. Or worse, if you do. So let’s work together. It doesn’t need to be a battle, we’re a team, right?

Think bigger, not just within a real legal contract and real customers. Think of that spec document and a “contract” the same way. You have to develop a new financial forecasting report for the CFO and Controller, right? If the data available isn’t sufficient to write the report or realize that summary data isn’t all that useful? Don’t just power through it. Collaborate! Figure it out! We’re a team, right?

Okay so it all leads here, it’s all about plans and change I mean who here has had a project that went exactly as planned? We should plan, because it gives us a guideline, it gives us a purpose. But we have to acknowledge that the path to completion is littered with pitfalls.

It’s important not just to acknowledge that you need to respond to change but provide ways to do it. People need ways to express that there’s a problem. Timebox – break work down into cycles – plan for 2 weeks of work not 2 years of work. This means every 2 weeks you get a chance to say “hey, this isn’t working.” Provide constant feedback loops. And then actually do something about it. Change.

If I don’t love what I’m doing I’ll do it. But I don’t feel like I have a purpose then. I don’t have a vested interest in the success of it. Telling me I get, let’s just say, stock options if a product is successful won’t assuage the fact that I was forced to make a horrible product. Being allowed to try out new tools or technologies, new techniques for solving problems, to rethink and propose changes to the product, to have some level of freedom in my day-to-day development, to have a voice in the course and planning of the project. These are the things that make working at Kinetic an incredible experience. And a happy employee is a productive employee.

At Kinetic we’re “scrumbut” – but getting better. You see, Agile is iterative, adaptive, and timeboxed. And we apply that to our process as well as our work. At Kinetic we plan 2 weeks at a time. This gives everyone a good view into what’s happening. Plans change, we have a retrospective, and then we refactor. We have “daily” standup. It’s transparent and anyone can come and usually we have someone from each area. They’re problem solving sessions, I might find out that the bug I was working on was already solved by Ben.

Agile is also psychological. This is why we have Burndown Charts. It’s really nice to see that line go down, to feel like you’re making progress. We’ve involved in planning involvement and estimation. This really helps prevent burnout.

Finally we have a level of autonomy. John and Kelly say what you want, but we decide on how because, again, that’s what we were hired to do.

Eight Top CIO Concerns for 2016: Research and Resources

Rapid business change combined with the increasing importance of technology across all aspects of business operations have raised the profile of the CIO role—as well as the challenges.

And with close to half of all current CIOs now in their 50s and 60s, the coming decade will see not just significant changes to this role, but also to the backgrounds and perspectives of the people coming into those jobs.

SIM 2016 IT trends studyThose are among the conclusions from the Society for Information Management‘s (SIM) IT Trends Study 2015.

Summarizing the report’s findings for InformationWeek, Jessica Davis writes that the report provides a “snapshot of (today’s) CIOs…(along with) insights into the technologies their organizations regard as essential today” and offers a close “look at what’s on the minds of these key executives.”

Continue reading “Eight Top CIO Concerns for 2016: Research and Resources”

How Service Catalogs Help Enterprise IT Innovation

Over the past few decades, organizations have applied technology primarily to reduce costs. Faster computers, instantaneous global communications, and specialized software for every business function have dramatically improved productivity and driven costs out of the value chain.

But the days of cost reduction as the primary focus of IT may have ended. As noted here a year ago, “improving the effectiveness of business processes” has replaced reducing costs as the top concern of IT leaders.

BPI IT innovation report - accelerating business transformationNow, fresh research from the Business Performance Innovation (BPI) Network reinforces and builds on this trend. Across enterprises, business leaders are looking to IT and new technologies to help “increase agility, improve customer experience, and make their companies more competitive.”

As the mission of IT is transformed from driving out costs to driving business model innovation, IT’s profile is raised as well. Per the BPI research, almost two-thirds (65%) of enterprises “say technology has become ‘far more important’ to their organizations in the past five years. Another 28% see it as ‘somewhat’ more important.”
Continue reading “How Service Catalogs Help Enterprise IT Innovation”