Hop on Board Now for the 2015 KEG Event at Early Bird Rates

The 2014 KEG event was a thrilling ride for attendees, with training, networking, and the first-ever Wally Awards, where companies were recognized for the innovative and creative use of Kinetic Data software.

KEG15 - Kinetic Enthusiasts GroupThis coming year’s journey to greater knowledge and success with Kinetic Data products, KEG15 – Platform for Success, will have a new destination: the historic Depot in downtown Minneapolis, a landmark hotel in a great location, with easy access to the Mississippi river, Target Field, microbreweries, restaurants and more. Continue reading “Hop on Board Now for the 2015 KEG Event at Early Bird Rates”

Video Highlights from KEG 2013

This year’s Kinetic Enthusiasts Group (KEG) event in Denver was again a valuable learning experience for Kinetic Data customers, partners and staff alike. Planning is already underway for KEG 2014.

If you missed the event earlier this year,  or were there but would like to look into the sessions you weren’t able to attend, or you just want to revisit some of the high points–check out video coverage of the event.

KEG 2013 opened with a keynote address by Eveline Oehrlich, currently VP, research director at Forrester Research. Among other topics, Eveline discussed how the role of IT must change in the “age of the customer,” and how the age of the customer is redefining competition among enterprises. In today’s marketplace, IT must enable rapid change across the value chain.

KEG 2013 Keynote from Kinetic Data on Vimeo.

Video Timeline:

0:14   John Sundberg introduces Eveline and the keynote topic of IT in the Age of the Customer
0:49   Eveline outlines her current role and background with HP
2:53   What is the “Age of the Customer” and what does it mean for IT? Who is “the customer”?
4:59   Agenda: How the Age of the Customer is redefining competition and how IT must change
5:21   How we arrived at the Age of the Customer
8:04   How the performance of companies like Apple have changed employee expectations of IT
9:34   The impact of demographics: what the next generation of workers will expect from IT
10:52   How the Age of the Customer impacts all forces of competition, e.g., how Netflix killed Blockbuster
13:33   How customer experiences drive success: easy, enjoyable and fast
16:42   How services eclipse products: an IT transformation success story
19:10   Users are now doing more of the technology sourcing work traditionally done by IT – which
can lead to support challenges
21:21   How IT investments are shifting from underlying, back end systems of record to user-facing
systems of engagement
22:56   IT skills need to shift from technology-focused to business-focused
24:10   A look at threats and opportunities for IT in the Age of the Customer – listening is critical
because the customer is now in charge
26:00   Services are becoming more important, and the concepts of the service catalog and
service request management now include business services broadly – not just IT services
27:01  Technology changes no longer come in waves, but as an overlapping storm
28:57   Why service management initiatives fail
29:54   What is the latest big disruption?
30:35   Thoughts on creating a functioning Project Management Office (PMO)
31:45   IT value needs to be cost-effective and productive – without too many surprises
36:04   The Old Service Management vs. The New Service Management
37:23   Priorities to focus on for improving the customer experience (flexible, social and smart)
40:21   The next wave of the Industrial Revolution
42:09   How to engineer the customer experience to be enjoyable, useful and valuable
43:20   The three new faces of IT
47:50  More about systems of engagement – new engagement models
49:35   How to define “services” – and where to start the thought process about service design
52:54   Service is in the eye of the customer – how to reflect this in service catalogs and service portfolios
55:30   Case study on business service value – leveraging virtual reality to accelerate product testing
57:32   The importance of positioning “automation” as an opportunity rather than a threat
1:00:58   The three levels of automation
1:03:57   How to “turbocharge” IT service processes
1:06:42   Business technology trends that make turbocharging essential
1:07:54  Audience questions
1:10:19   How to work with “ABC” of corporate culture and behavior
1:14:42   How to make email service requests more effective – while still accommodating
user needs and wants
1:16:28   Wrapping up: IT as we know if is dead,  here’s what’s next – three key takeaways

Real-world customer success stories were again a major theme at this year’s event. Mark Klein and Michael Dyson of CareTech Solutions, a leading healthcare IT services provider, discussed how the Kinetic Data products help their company deliver outsourced IT help desk services to more than 100 customers and 200 hospitals across 33 states. Mark and Michael demonstrate how they used Kinetic Request to build advanced forms for distributed iPad terminals.

KEG 2013 Customer Story Highlights (CareTech) from Kinetic Data on Vimeo.

The conference also included in-depth sessions on Kinetic Data products, such as What’s New in Kinetic Task 3.0 and Lessons Learned from Successful Request Projects. All of the 2013 KEG presentations are now available (most sessions in both PowerPoint and video formats) on the Kinetic Community website.

What’s New in Kinetic Task 3.0

Ben Christenson, one of the primary architects and developers for Kinetic Task,  is presenting “What’s New in Kinetic Task 3.0” today at the 2nd annual KEG (Kinetic Enthusiasts Group) Conference.  For those of you who couldn’t make it to the Denver event, here are  some highlights of his presentation.

One of the biggest questions we got during KEG 2012 was: “When can I use Kinetic Task to automate workflows outside of Kinetic Request?” The answer is right now with the release of Kinetic Task 3.0.

We’ve  always had the long-term goal of making the Kinetic Task engine a kind of platform- and application-agnostic enterprise “glue”  that provided a modular approach to workflow automation anywhere in  the enterprise where automation could deliver real benefits.  Our initial focus was on ITSM service request automation delivered through a Kinetic Request management portal.  (That’s why we bundled Kinetic Task with Kinetic Request.)  But interest at KEG 2012 in bringing  the power of the Kinetic Task automation engine to other parts of the enterprise was so strong  that we vowed to make Kinetic Task work with any application by the time KEG 2013 rolled around.

And I  mean any application. Or at least any application that can trigger a call back into Kinetic Task based on some event, like a new or updated field in an application database, and automatically launch a task tree.  The user experience won’t change. Task trees will still be built and processes configured in the same ways.  But now tasks can be triggered from any application, not just Kinetic Request.  That includes home-grown applications, which can be configured with Task Handlers and linked to  Kinetic Task through an improved  API.

So what can you now do with Task 3.0?   When  users learn of Kinetic Task’s radically expanded functionality, their imaginations ran riot.  Just think of it—simplified business process automation in any nook and cranny of the enterprise where, in the past,  the cost of the development effort couldn’t be justified.  In HR, facilities management, sales and marketing, finance, logistics, operations, and customer service (indeed, just about any area of the business), you can leverage your familiarity with  Kinetic Task to build automated  workflows.

Kinetic Task Workflow Automation Engine
Several other enhancements have been  made in Kinetic Task 3.0, including an improved API, easier installation, an improved admin console, and changes to Kinetic Security Language (KSL) to create a powerful new strategy for implementing business-logic-driven security policies. But the real difference is summarized by the slide above. Before, Kinetic Task only accepted input from Kinetic Request.  Now, Kinetic Task 3.0 , which is still packaged with Kinetic Request but also available independently, has  been opened up to allow any external source to start a task tree. That means it can backend any data source. And it can deliver process automation anywhere you want using the Kinetic Task knowledge and skills you already have.

Get in touch with me (Ben. Christenson[AT]KineticData.com) if you want to learn more.

Last Day of Early Bird Rate for KEG 2013 – Register Today!

Today is the final day of the early bird special for the Kinetic Enthusiasts Group (KEG) 2013 event, to be held once again at the beautiful Inverness Hotel in Denver.

The keynote speaker for this year’s conference will be Eveline Oehrlich, a principal analyst at Forrester Research. Evenline’s areas of focus at Forrester include information technology infrastructure library (ITIL), the implementation of IT service management, business service management (BSM), and many other aspects of IT operations. In this role, she offers strategic guidance to help enterprises worldwide manage their networks and systems, define key projects that focus on IT service management, and bridge IT to the lines of business.

Last year, attendees came to KEG to learn more about products like the Kinetic Task workflow automation engine, get new ideas for use of service requests, and to discuss the future direction of Kinetic Data products.

This year’s conference will feature sessions on moving from a queue-based model to a schedule-based approach for service desks, creating blueprints for service items, connecting service items in a parent-child relationship within a service request, and much more.

Get more details about the event as well as the new pre-event training sessions, and sign up today to take advantage of special pricing for KEG 2013.