Why I Joined KineticData

TL,DR; I’ve never worked for a company where they could handle the bandwidth of my ideas. It feels good. Kinetic Data is in the perfect position to make a big impact on the technology aspect of many industries. To prove it we’re paying cash to build solutions on top of our platform.

My tech career started with ServiceNow. Actually, it really started on a home-grown filemaker system, then ServiceNow. </tangent>

If you’ve been in the tech industry even slightly longer than me, you probably realize why my short tenure and lack of exposure to “legacy systems” skews my perception. Our industry has a rich history of trials, tribulations and successes. The first exposure to older systems of record taught me that several vendors and tools had gone through a “vicious cycle”.  This was usually because the tools or company had:

  • Become too disparate
  • Relied on archaic code bases (technical debt)
  • Politics or other in-fighting with partners or business practices
  • Overpricing
  • Crazy licensing
  • Undervaluing
  • Overvaluing
  • Poor architecture
  • Grown by acquisition
  • Wasn’t innovative enough
  • Outgrew themselves

and a myriad of other reasons. Having heard these experiences, told by those more experienced, trends appeared and I realized;

History repeats itself.

This isn’t new information, but it’s a new look at our current reality.

The complex becomes the simple, only to become complex again. And we certainly see this in the stories of our industry. The term “coded into a corner” has become a common description for technology platforms that support automation and technology management.

OverComplicatedOverTime

This is a vicious cycle technologists understand very well. Companies implement systems regularly. Some systems have more stickiness than others, some are more durable, some have more staying power. Organizations have baggage too, some can adapt quickly, some have the discipline to squeeze more life or value out of platforms than others.

How can we stop this cycle? It is damaging the reputations of service providers, projects, departments and individuals. Start by not doing anything on the list above. There are two things that are imperative for ideas and companies to survive:

  1. Decentralize work: enabling the customer to manage their own business processes
  2. Well architected technology: make integration and platform value longer lasting by making wise choices

It is cruel to list those two behemoths like that. Both of these goals are massive undertakings with massive benefits.

How to get there

How does a team make progress toward those goals? Firstly, make them organizational goals, secondly make them department goals, and thirdly make decisions to support this direction. Whether it’s hiring or training architects, giving them the proper oversight (by having them report to non technical leadership) and by giving them power to change your systems.

So Why Kinetic Data?

There are a lot of reasons of course. Primarily as a marketer and technologist, I need to strongly believe in a product before I can successfully make others believe. I’ve seen what KD is building and I have faith that it will not only change the way you look at platforms again, but it will help companies achieve the two goals listed above.

I’ve had the pleasure to work at a handful of companies and Kinetic Data has a very healthy and supportive psychological culture and environment. Never have my ideas been so welcome and accepted in a professional setting. People are eager to try new things, fail quickly and feel the support of our team if we make mistakes.

If you want to see what I’ve seen – give it a whirl. Sign up for more information, trials and demos here.

The Curb Appeal of your Catalog

Performing regular application rationalization presents countless opportunities for organizations to recover waste, reduce costs and add efficiency. Although large enterprise platforms are beholden to theseWally_Shopping rationalization projects, they are often overlooked as out-of-scope.

This is usually because removing the platform has disastrous results for the customer experience.These platforms are low-hanging fruit for organizations to save millions in operations costs.

The choices you make today, drastically impact your ability to be flexible and vendor neutral tomorrow.

Thanks to several years of customer experience being a fad (and now a trend), many software manufacturers are refactoring and struggling to decrease switching costs while still providing you value.
Ideally each of your business partners and software suppliers should be working with you to decrease time to value and increase value.

Scoping Technology Differently, Differentiates

tl;dr (too long, didn’t read) – Switching to the latest toolset just catches you up to competitors, it doesn’t take you past them. If your goal is differentiation and increasing value past “par” then design for rapid technology change, perform regular system evaluations and have an honest and transparent tool selection processes.

 

Your enterprise has several platforms that are capable of accomplishing literally anything. With enough development these systems can likely perform many business functions. But should they? Just because your jackknife has a saw doesn’t mean you will enjoy using it; there may be a better tool.

How can you tell what each system should do? Enter the “Enterprise Architect” (EA), this person is essentially a business analyst and technologist, and hopefully has a great deal of understanding how systems fit together. They are ready to tell you which tools should do which tasks. They do this by analyzing toolsets and balancing the goal of optimizing value while decreasing overhead. For instance, building an intranet site for department use on SAP is going to take quite a bit of customization and org-change, while Sharepoint is built for this purpose (and your company already has a license). Bring them your goals.

This applies to all functional areas. Daily work in human resources (HR) handles aspects of talent and career paths, these functions are unique to this team and have specific tools that work great for this space.  Building something from scratch is not a wise investment and can lead quickly to waste and missed opportunity. But if the organization is a talent agency, it’s likely they have a custom system for managing people. This is their differentiation.

So what happens when new tools or demands are raised? Enter the “Business Relationship Manager” (BRM), this role is essentially a business analyst with great listening and persuasion skills. These people partner with the architects mentioned above to make things happen – this can mean pushing features that didn’t exist before, switching platforms or finding better data sources or integrations.

In the HR example above you can quickly see how HR uses these features and technology to differentiate their value. They are collectively better as they improve and iterate their tools and processes. Perhaps their toolset allows them to cross-reference LinkedIn data with compensation, or compare performance with career path; whatever the case, if there is business value in quality talent, enabling these toolsets is the goal. This should be clear to the BRM and Architect alike, and they should know whether the talent management system can handle an integration of that sort. Maybe they get a business intelligence app involved or just work slowly toward this goal.

This applies broadly across the enterprise. If you aren’t able to differentiate, you run the risk of missed value and ultimately irrelevancy. As technology continues to be the differentiator of choice, the importance of having quality Architects and BRMs increases. Getting quality masterful value out of your toolsets is their sweet spot.

Where Data Security Fits in Two-Speed IT

“Where does security fit in bi-modal IT departments?” asks Mary K. Pratt on CSO Online. She explores the question with IT leaders from a handful of organizations, opening her discussion by noting:

“The bi-modal idea has its benefits and its pitfalls but the determination seems to come down to the size of the enterprise. In the mid to smaller companies, there is not the luxury of splitting the security group out into subgroups. In the bigger companies the question becomes where do the security folks belong.”

Though the CIOs she speaks to take different approaches to managing bi-modal or two-speed IT, they generally agree on two points:

where security fits in 2-speed IT1) It’s best to perform both speeds or modes of IT–innovation and operations–in one centralized group, rather than two separate teams where the innovators “throw things over the wall” to operations as applications are developed.

In this structure, the same individuals work on both innovation initiatives and day-to-day operations tasks, though overall a greater share of time is spent on operations, and employees vary in how much time they spend on each type of work.

2) Security has become so important, as cyber threats have multiplied, that it must be baked into new projects, not added later as an afterthought. Ultimately though, security “should sit in operations.”

Continue reading “Where Data Security Fits in Two-Speed IT”

Agile, DevOps Feed the Need for (Business) Speed

Remember the story of the tortoise and the hare? “Slow and steady wins the race”? Econ 101 lectures about economies of scale? Business truisms like “Nobody ever got fired for buying…” (insert any large, established vendor name here)?

Such nuggets of business wisdom seem to no longer apply. Today, in the words of author Jason Jennings, “It’s not the big that eat the small, it’s the fast that eat the slow.” Competitive advantage comes from reworking business processes and service delivery models to improve speed not by 10% or even 100%, but by multiples. Consider:

  • How Agile, Scrum and DevOps meet need for business speedAccording to a recent Financial Times story by Lisa Pollack, “A Berlin company, founded in 2013, built an online service that allows new customers to open a bank account in under eight minutes…The company, Number26, has signed up more than 30,000 customers after launching what it deems ‘Europe’s most modern bank account’ in January.”

Continue reading “Agile, DevOps Feed the Need for (Business) Speed”

How to Provision a Virtual Private Cloud in 45 Seconds

By Andrew Kramer and Matt Howe

There’s increasing interest among enterprises in IaaS (Infrastructure-as-a-Service). Many organizations are moving their servers to cloud-based providers like Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure, among others. The promise of the cloud is fast and cheap infrastructure, but that needs also be balanced with security and control.

Top cloud services providersAll cloud providers offer API integration to their services; Amazon has a vast array of services and completely documented APIs (and even a Ruby SDK), making the work of creating integration with these services fairly easy—if you have the right tools.

One of our customers, a global technology company, recently asked us to create a way to provision a Virtual Private Cloud that included their business rules—something they’ve struggled with using other tooling. Continue reading “How to Provision a Virtual Private Cloud in 45 Seconds”

Five Keys to Successful Collaboration in the Future of Work

Despite panic-inducing, high-shock-value headlines like Will machines eventually take every job?, there’s little to worry about for most workers. Robots are more likely to supplement human labor than to replace it.

But while automation technologies broadly speaking (robots, “smart” machines, and software) may not destroy many jobs (if any) on net, they will certainly change the nature of the future of work.

Future of work is more collaboration than robotsThe work of the future will be technology-assisted, data-driven, and collaborative. Simple, autonomous tasks (e.g., scanning a barcode) are easy to automate. Complex tasks requiring a mix of expertise (e.g., designing and developing a business software application) are far more difficult, and not candidates for automation any time soon.

Continue reading “Five Keys to Successful Collaboration in the Future of Work”

Looking Back: The Top 20 at 200

As the Kinetic Vision blog approaches another significant milestone, its 200th post, here’s a look back at the top 20 most-read posts since the blog’s launch in March of 2011.

Not surprisingly, the phrases that occur most frequently in the posts below indicate readers are most interested in industry research about request management (that’s what we do), its applications (service catalogs, employee onboarding, BYOD) and its benefits (cost savings, process automation, risk management).

Request management blog posts: - top 20 at 200It’s also not surprising many of these are “evergreen” posts; these are articles with a long “shelf life” that continue to draw significant numbers of views month after month. The most-read post so far in 2015 (How IT Will Change by 2020 – Research From HDI) narrowly missed the list below, coming in at #23 all-time.

Here then are the top 20:

Continue reading “Looking Back: The Top 20 at 200”